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Juneteenth comes to Apopka

Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th.
Juneteenth celebrates just one of the United States’ 20 emancipation days – and the history of how emancipated people were kept unfree needs to be remembered, too
The actual day was June 19, 1865, and it was the Black dockworkers in Galveston, Texas, who first heard the word that freedom for the enslaved had come.
Historic Iwo Jima footage shows individual Marines amid the larger battle
When most Americans think of the World War II battle for Iwo Jima – if they think of it at all, 75 years later – they think of one image: Marines raising the U.S. flag atop Mount Suribachi.
The unsinkable Diane Velazquez
Molly Brown was an American socialite and philanthropist in the early 20th century. Brown spent the first months of 1912 in Paris, visiting her daughter until she received word from Denver that …
The Museum of the Apopkans celebrates Women's History Month with Girl Power, Promoting Hope! event
Throughout this month, the Museum of the Apopkans has had special exhibits honoring local women and spotlighting trailblazing American women. Thursday's event concludes this month of inspiration.
Ketanji Brown Jackson’s path to Supreme Court nomination was paved by trailblazing Black women judges
Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s rise is, in part, due to the work of those women and Black men – and to Black women judges dating back almost a century.
Orange County honoring Vietnam Veterans this Friday
Vietnam Era Veterans who served from November 1, 1955, through May 15, 1975, regardless of location will be eligible to receive the 50th Commemoration of Vietnam Veterans Pin and Presidential Proclamation. 

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Five groundbreaking researchers who mapped the ocean floor, tested atomic theories, vanquished malaria and more
Here are five profiles from The Conversation’s archive that highlight the brilliance, grit, and unique perspectives of five women who worked in geosciences, math, ornithology, pharmacology, and physics during the 20th century.
How a saint’s day played a key role in the struggle for Irish nationhood
Amid the dyed-green rivers and pints of Guinness, it can be easy to forget the symbolic importance of St Patrick’s Day to Irish people in the early 20th century.
Purim spiels: Skits and satire have brought merriment to an ancient Jewish holiday in America
In this tale, the queen stayed true to her Jewish roots and used her status to sway her husband, King Achashverosh, to defend the Jews against the sinister plans of Haman, the king’s adviser, who had plotted to wipe them out.
How civil rights leader Wyatt Tee Walker revived hope after MLK’s death
Nearly two weeks after King’s funeral, in April of 1968, King’s confidant and former strategist Wyatt Tee Walker tried to renew this faith.
The story of Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, America’s first black pop star
In antebellum America, operatic and concert songs were very popular forms of entertainment. European concert sopranos, such as Jenny Lind and Catherine Hayes, drew huge crowds and rave reviews during their U.S. tours.
African-American GIs of WWII: Fighting for democracy abroad and at home
The “tan soldiers,” as the black press affectionately called them, were also for the most part left out of the triumphant narrative of America’s “Greatest Generation.”
South Apopka parade honors the legacy of MLK, and pays tribute to a local icon
Tradition, legacy, and honor will lead the way Monday afternoon in South Apopka when the 13th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. parade commences at 2 pm.
How George Washington used his first Thanksgiving as president to unite a new country
For his first presidential Thanksgiving, George Washington aimed to pull his country together in the face of the many internal divisions that could yank it apart.
The best way to follow through on your New Year’s resolution? Make an ‘old year’s resolution’
With the “old year” approach, perhaps you can sidestep the inevitable challenges that come with traditional New Year’s resolutions and achieve lasting, positive changes.
The history of Christmas
The middle of winter has long been a time of celebration around the world. Centuries before the arrival of Jesus, early Europeans celebrated light and birth in the darkest days of winter.
The Christmas truce football match – a picture of a Greek kickabout is misappropriated yearly
The Christmas truce took place on December 25th, 1914. At certain points along the line in France and Flanders, British and German soldiers met between their trenches, shaking hands, sharing stories, and posing for photographs.
What does Kwanzaa mean for Black Americans?
The name Kwanzaa is derived from the phrase “matunda ya kwanza” which means “first fruits” in Swahili, the most widely spoken African language. However, Kwanzaa, the holiday, did not exist in Africa.
Presents from a princess
Elisabeth Basford’s recent biography of Mary (the first for a century) has cast new light on this reticent, shy but dedicated young woman. Basford rebranded her as the “first modern princess”.
How the poinsettia took over Christmas
behind the beautiful, blood-red bracts of the poinsettia, there’s a story rife with geopolitics, patent wars, a dethroned monopoly, and complex supply chains.